Video 9 Mar 16 notes

gaymoviesworld:

UTOPIES
France, 2011, 22 min
Thomas meets Julien via Internet.  From different backgrounds, in search of different experiences, they penetrate the suburbs around Paris.   The discoveries will nourish their own personal utopia.  Julien leads Thomas to the remains of an industrial building where he wants to try something new. The utopia of a new love emerges and is as fragile, troubling, contradictory and ephemeral as the hopes of a future gone by.

Photo 27 Feb 248 notes destroyed-and-abandoned:

Abandoned pier at the filming location of Alfred Hitchcock’s movie The Birds - Bodega Bay, California
Source: Chris Luckhardt (flickr)

Would like to reshoot the scene with this pier: 

destroyed-and-abandoned:

Abandoned pier at the filming location of Alfred Hitchcock’s movie The Birds - Bodega Bay, California

Source: Chris Luckhardt (flickr)

Would like to reshoot the scene with this pier: 

Photo 27 Feb 248 notes destroyed-and-abandoned:

Abandoned pier at the filming location of Alfred Hitchcock’s movie The Birds - Bodega Bay, California
Source: Chris Luckhardt (flickr)

wow. would like to reshoot the Bird scene with this pier :-)

destroyed-and-abandoned:

Abandoned pier at the filming location of Alfred Hitchcock’s movie The Birds - Bodega Bay, California

Source: Chris Luckhardt (flickr)

wow. would like to reshoot the Bird scene with this pier :-)

Photo 26 Feb 16,348 notes

(Source: whatilove)

Link 30 Jan Inside the Making of Dr. Strangelove»

Today is the 50th birthday of the film! Happy birthday !

Video 28 Jan

my poetic gay short movie in the utopian suburbs of paris (french with english subtitles

Link 25 Jan 111 notes OUR RUSSIAN ROMEOS SPEAK OUT!»

planetromeoinside:

image
Photographer: Cris Toala Olivares

The Russian government adopted an Anti-Gay Propaganda Law on the 9th of June, 2013. This caused enormous outrage in the LGBT-community. Even a boycott of the Olympic Winter Games in Sochi was up for discussion.

It was with deepening concern that we…

Link 18 Jan 594 notes The first picture won a prize and the second one became controversial»

politicaysociedad:

VERSIÓN EN ESPAÑOL

A controversy has arisen on Sweden because of the Paul Hansen’s picture, which won in the Swedish Picture of the Year Awards 2011, in the picture we can see Fabienne, a 14 year old girl who was murdered by the police after she was caught stealing two chairs and some…

via .
Photo 19 Dec 9,497 notes

(Source: picturebgd)

via ICPhoto.
Photo 23 Sep 114 notes cinephilearchive:

22-year old UCLA student Francis Ford Coppola directing The Peeper, which was developed into Tonight for Sure (1962).

Many a struggling young filmmaker has taken advantage of the quick money and relative  anonymity of, um, adult entertainment early in their career. Wes Craven and Barry Sonnenfeld worked on porn sets to pay the bills, and future Godfather director Francis Ford Coppola’s first two directorial efforts, from 1962, were in the “nudie cutie” vein — softcore movies, from back when naked flesh on-screen was still a big deal. According to Jami Bernard’s invaluable book First Films, Coppola directed a short called “The Peeper” while still at UCLA film school; it concerned a bumbling peeping Tom trying to catch a glimpse of skin during a photo shoot. “The Peeper” was joined with another short by another young filmmaker and released as Tonight for Sure. He was then hired to add new, nudity-and-slapstick material to a 1958 German movie, which was re-titled The Bellboy and the Playgirls. But Coppola discovered he was too soft-hearted for the nudie racket: “There was a 3-D scene where we had to have five girls sitting at their dressers,” he recalled, “and they were hired and paid to do this. One of the girls came to me and said, ‘I’m only seventeen and my father is going to kill me.’ So I said, ‘Well, okay, leave your brassiere on.’ So there were these four girls, plus one who has a bra on, and I got fired because they were complaining they paid the girls five hundred dollars. So this has been one of the themes in my life. Maybe when I’m eighty I’ll break through the nudity barrier.” —Jason Bailey, The Embarrassing Early Films of Oscar-Winning Directors


The themes of voyeurism in The Peeper would return in one of Coppola’s finest films, 1974’s The Conversation. And Coppola’s 1996 film Jack would confirm what The Bellboy hinted: that his gifts are not in the realm of comedy.

With thanks to LoSceicco1976 for the photo


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cinephilearchive:

22-year old UCLA student Francis Ford Coppola directing The Peeper, which was developed into Tonight for Sure (1962).


Many a struggling young filmmaker has taken advantage of the quick money and relative  anonymity of, um, adult entertainment early in their career. Wes Craven and Barry Sonnenfeld worked on porn sets to pay the bills, and future Godfather director Francis Ford Coppola’s first two directorial efforts, from 1962, were in the “nudie cutie” vein — softcore movies, from back when naked flesh on-screen was still a big deal. According to Jami Bernard’s invaluable book First Films, Coppola directed a short called “The Peeper” while still at UCLA film school; it concerned a bumbling peeping Tom trying to catch a glimpse of skin during a photo shoot. “The Peeper” was joined with another short by another young filmmaker and released as Tonight for Sure. He was then hired to add new, nudity-and-slapstick material to a 1958 German movie, which was re-titled The Bellboy and the Playgirls. But Coppola discovered he was too soft-hearted for the nudie racket: “There was a 3-D scene where we had to have five girls sitting at their dressers,” he recalled, “and they were hired and paid to do this. One of the girls came to me and said, ‘I’m only seventeen and my father is going to kill me.’ So I said, ‘Well, okay, leave your brassiere on.’ So there were these four girls, plus one who has a bra on, and I got fired because they were complaining they paid the girls five hundred dollars. So this has been one of the themes in my life. Maybe when I’m eighty I’ll break through the nudity barrier.” —Jason Bailey, The Embarrassing Early Films of Oscar-Winning Directors

The themes of voyeurism in The Peeper would return in one of Coppola’s finest films, 1974’s The Conversation. And Coppola’s 1996 film Jack would confirm what The Bellboy hinted: that his gifts are not in the realm of comedy.

With thanks to LoSceicco1976 for the photo


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